5 best gaming TVs for PS5, Xbox Series X and Nintendo Switch

 

1. Best big-screen gaming TV: Sony Bravia X900H/XH90

Gamers won’t be disappointed by Sony’s mid-range marvel

SPECIFICATIONS
Available sizes: 55, 65, 75-inch
Input lag:
Refresh rate: 120Hz
VRR: No
HDMI 2.1: Yes
REASONS TO BUY
+HDMI 2.1 support+Great value
REASONS TO AVOID
Brash Android interfaceNo HDR10+

The Sony X900H/XH90 is a solid choice for a mid-spec LCD television, offering smooth motion, excellent HDR, and capable processing all at a reasonable price point – even at this massive 75-inch size.

You may be wondering why we’re featuring the XH90 instead of the higher-spec XH95 model, but it’s worth noting that the former is the only of the two that offers HDMI 2.1 support. While it didn’t launch with the TV, a firmware update in late 2020 brought the HDMI 2.1 standard to two of the television’s ports, making it a smart choice for an affordable 4K TV with good support for dedicated gaming TV features.

You’re not getting VRR (variable refresh rate) or ALLM (auto low latency mode) just yet either, but Sony is expected to introduce it at some point. With Sony’s X1 Ultimate processor, and basic HDMI 2.1 support, you can’t go overly wrong here.

The upscaling is on point too for showing off HD sources, while the 20W of audio offer full-bodied sound and even Atmos support, making a dedicated soundbar less of an urgent buy.

2. Best cheap gaming TV: Samsung TU8000 Series

A great budget pick, the TU8000 looks great and makes your games look good, too

SPECIFICATIONS
Available sizes: 43, 50, 55, 65, 75-inch
Input lag:
Refresh rate: 60Hz
VRR: No
HDMI 2.1: No
REASONS TO BUY
+Low input lag! +Solid motion handling
REASONS TO AVOID
Narrow viewing anglesLacks brightness

If your living room – and budget – can’t handle a 65-inch TV, take a look at the truly spectacular TU8000 Series. You’ll get an incredibly low input lag (just 9.7ms) as well as a motion handling technology to keep the action looking consistently smooth. What else could you ask for?

You’re not getting all of the gaming technologies of some other sets in this list, as HDMI 2.1, VRR (variable refresh rate), or a 120Hz panel – but for the everyday gamer, this is a set that gets the basics very right.

You will need to watch out for the narrow viewing angles: content looks best straight on, with color draining from the sides, so it might not be the best choice for four-party Switch game sessions. On the whole, though, this is a solid choice for those wanting a gaming TV on the cheap.

3. Best gaming TV on a budget: TCL 6-Series (US)

The best budget 4K TV for gamers with shallow pockets

SPECIFICATIONS
Available sizes: 55, 65, 75-inch
Input lag: 17.7ms
Refresh rate: 60Hz
VRR: No
HDMI 2.1: No
REASONS TO BUY
+Bright, colorful HDR+Supports Dolby Vision
REASONS TO AVOID
Loss of darker detailsLimited motion settings

If you have deep pockets and a checkbook filled with blank checks, we’d tell you to reach deep and shell out for only the best 4K TVs on the market – or the pricier models listed above. But that’s not always realistic: for the vast, vast majority of us, our budget to spend on a 4K UHD TV is limited to somewhere under $1,000 – and often it’s even less than that.

To that end, it’s absolutely fair to say that the TCL 6-Series is the best TV you can possibly get in this price range. Its performance per dollar is unmatched and its picture quality – despite a few minor flaws – will truly impress you for what you’re paying.

Said simply, if there’s a better value 4K TV on the market, we’ve yet to see it. If you’re not based in the US, though, read on for other affordable gaming TVs worth considering.

4. Best gaming TV: Samsung Q80T QLED TV

A mid-range Samsung QLED with low, low input lag

SPECIFICATIONS
Available sizes: 49, 55, 65, 75, 82-inch
Input lag: 8.7ms
Refresh rate: 4K/120Hz
VRR: Yes
HDMI 2.1: No
REASONS TO BUY
+Very low input lag+OTS audio
REASONS TO AVOID
No Dolby Vision supportNo Freeview Play

Sure, there are more expensive new Samsung TVs out there, but none make the case for gaming quite like the Samsung Q80T. As much as we’d like to recommend higher-end models like the Q95T or (moving into 8K territory) the Q950TS, it’s the Q80T that really nails that price-performance ratio. (It’s no coincidence you’ll find it in our guide to the best 65-inch TVs too.)

It’s the cheapest Samsung QLED with a full-array backlight, meaning you don’t have to skimp with an edge-lit display (like last year’s Q60R). Despite the name, it’s also the successor to last year’s Q70R, which previously topped this guide – but beating the Q70R’s 14ms input lag with an exceptionally low 8.7ms. That means you’ll get as little delay as possible between button mashing your PS5 controller and seeing the action onscreen.

That figure is reached by turning off Game Motion Plus (which reduces screen judder), but even without it you’ll get a respectable 19.7ms.

The externals of the television are a bit plainer than some of the higher-end QLEDs out there, like the zero-bezel Q950TS 8K QLED, and we found in our tests the odd speck of blooming around bright light sources – but the picture is still pretty exceptional, with bright HDR and AI-enhanced images to make this a great choice for any viewer-gamer buying a TV right now.

The OTS sound system also means you’re getting some serious audio credentials – whether you’re listening to the cry of enemies or the ambient sounds of walking simulators.

5. Best gaming TV for color: LG CX OLED TV

LG’s flagship OLED has some gaming tricks up its sleeve

SPECIFICATIONS
Available sizes: 48, 55, 65, 77-inch
Input lag: Sub-1ms
Refresh rate: 4K/120Hz
VRR: Yes
HDMI 2.1: Yes
REASONS TO BUY
+Stellar picture quality+Four HDMI 2.1 ports
REASONS TO AVOID
Heavy bass can distortNo HDR10+ support

The LG CX OLED TV doesn’t look like a big step forward from the acclaimed LG C9 model on paper, but LG has done an incredible job of focusing in on the niggles we had in the previous model, and rendering its flagship OLED TV perfect in pretty much every way. The result is a mesmerisingly cinematic performance that will give movies and TV shows the loving treatment they deserve.

But LG has also managed to make its OLED range an excellent choice for gamers. With sub-1ms input lag, you’ll be getting a astonishing level of responsiveness from your games, and the implementation of four HDMI 2.1 ports means you can plug in as many next-gen consoles as you can bear owning.

The HDMI 2.1 ports are technically 10-bit, rather than 12-bit – something that Samsung’s Q80T’s single HDMI 2.1 port has the upper hand with – but we don’t think you’ll be disappointed with what you see.

You’ll also get VRR (variable refresh rate), 4K/120fps support, and incredible OLED-assisted contrast alongside.

You may have concerns around image retention, when static sections of a picture (say, a HUD) are looped so often that they permanently mark the panel. This isn’t a massive risk, especially since OLED TV makers have developed ‘screen shift’ technologies to regularly adjust the placement of onscreen  pictures to help prevent this (via LG)

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